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dc.contributorDella-Torre, Emanuel
dc.creatorMilanović, Milomir S.
dc.creatorKadijević, Djordje
dc.creatorStojanović, Ljudmila
dc.creatorMilovanović, Branislav
dc.creatorDjoković, Aleksandra
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-17T11:32:14Z
dc.date.available2022-01-17T11:32:14Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.issn1010-660X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/1648-9144/58/1/76
dc.identifier.urihttp://ipir.ipisr.org.rs/handle/123456789/721
dc.description.abstractBackground and Objectives: The concentration of antibodies against virus influenza A H1N1 in the titer (≥1:32) positively correlates with resistance to flu in healthy persons. In elderly and immune-compromised patients, an influenza vaccine may be less immunogenic. Hypothesis: A lower post-vaccinal antibody titer (≥1:16) may be sero-protective against respiratory viral infections in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus—24; Rheumatoid Arthritis—15; and Sjögren’s Syndrome—11), who were at least 65 years old or whose relative disease duration (disease duration/age) was greater than 1/8, were examined. Thirty-four of them were vaccinated with a trivalent inactivated non-adjuvant influenza vaccine. The antibody concentration against influenza virus A H1N1 was measured using the standardized hemagglutination inhibition test and patients who got any respiratory viral infection were registered. To test the hypothesis, a correlative analysis was applied, followed by a binary logistic regression that included potential confounding variables, such as age, disease duration and therapy (personal/health-related conditions). Results: Vaccinated patients were significantly less affected by respiratory viral infections (21% vs. 75%). The lower titer considered (≥1:16) was significantly present more often among vaccinated patients (68% vs. 6%). The correlation between its presence/absence and that of respiratory viral infections was –0.34 (p < 0.05). The binary logistic regression evidenced the relevance of this correlation, confirming the hypothesis. Vaccination was associated with the 87.3% reduction in the likelihood of getting respiratory viral infections, whereas the lower antibody titer (≥1:16) was associated with the 77.6% reduction in the likelihood of getting respiratory viral infections. The vaccine was well tolerated by all patients and after vaccination no exacerbation of the underlying disease was observed. Conclusions: A lower antibody titer (≥1:16) against influenza virus A H1N1 could be protective against respiratory viral infections for certain autoimmune rheumatic diseases patients, which confirms the clinical effectiveness of influenza vaccination.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/inst-2020/200018/RS//
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceMedicina
dc.subjectautoimmune rheumatic diseases
dc.subjectclinical effectiveness of influenza vaccination
dc.subjectpersonal/health-related conditions
dc.subjectrespiratory viral infections
dc.subjectsero-protective titer
dc.titleA Lower Level of Post-Vaccinal Antibody Titer against Influenza Virus A H1N1 May Protect Patients with Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases from Respiratory Viral Infections
dc.typearticleen
dc.typearticle
dc.rights.licenseBY
dc.citation.epage86
dc.citation.issue1
dc.citation.spage76
dc.citation.volume58
dc.description.otherA part of this research study performed by D.M.K. was funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Contract No. 451-03-9/2021-14/200018). Institutional Review Board Statement
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/medicina58010076
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://ipir.ipisr.org.rs/bitstream/id/2189/bitstream_2189.pdf
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85122464307
dc.identifier.wos000756976700001
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion


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